Magic doors.

Door-Rundquist
Salzburg: a magical little metropolis tucked away amongst rolling green countryside and the snowcapped peaks of the Austrian Alps.  Baroque towers and churches with copper domes stand high above the winding cobblestone streets–streets with more stories than you and I could possibly be told. Around every corner of those storytelling streets are doors…and that is where the magic is found.

What would be discovered with the turn of a knob or the lift of a latch? Had this same archway stood above Maria Von Trapp as she ushered her children about town, or been brushed by the hands of young Mozart on his way to Sunday school?

An ornate metal gate presents a grand cathedral where people have kneeled to pray since Europe’s Golden Age.  A worn wooden door opens to a quiet tavern, where hopes and dreams are whispered over glasses of malted ale.  An ivy-covered pillar leads to a garden bursting with rows roses, and flowers dripping from spiraling fences.  A clear glass entryway displays baskets of shining, glittering ornaments being arranged by the owner of a tiny shop.

As the laughter and lively chatter fade away from the streets with the sun, the pale stone of the city is cast in blue shadows. The soft orange glow from behind drawn curtains illuminates the doorways, and glistens off of their polished hinges and rivets, making them appear even more mysterious than the did in the daylight.  You are reminded of the possibilities waiting on the other side of each fantastic one.

Of all the European cities I have explored, Salzburg makes me feel most at home, but also the most bewildered by its glimpses of unknown possibilities.  It’s an entrancing juxtaposition—one that you can only be understood by experiencing it yourself.

So as you adventure within the hills, below the towers, among the streets, and behind the doors remember that the nooks and crannies are where Salzburg hides its magic.  It’s up to you to find it.

By Lauren Rundquist

To get a glimpse into others’ discoveries behind the magical doors of Salzburg, look no further than Pinterest.  To plan an adventure of your own, Lonely Planet is a good place to start.