Set the world ablaze, the battle between far left anarcho-extremists against the higher german authority.

Feuer PKW - Berlin Charlottenburg

Arson is on the rise in the German capital. Over 372 cars have been torched since the start of the year. However, no arrests have been made, and no one has claiming responsibility. Government Officials believe the motives for all the destruction are somehow related to the upcoming election in Germany. Car burnings have been a form of protest for far left winged extremist. Luxury cars brands like Ferrari, BMW and Mercedes are usually the target of such vandalism.

However, the present burnings have also included vans, delivery, trucks, and automobiles. Until recently, most of these extreme forms of protest have been seen in Germany’s alternative eastern districts; Friedrichshain, Mitte, and Prenzlauer Berg. Nonetheless, these more recent car burnings have started appearing in districts like Tiergarten and Charolettenburg.

Monday the 15th, and Tuesday the 16th saw a combined total of over 30 cars destroyed in August. Following the Senator for interior policy’s speech, Wednesday night saw another nine cars destroyed in or around the area of Berlin. Although no one has been hurt so far, authorities fear that such a rise in the number of cases of vandalism may be a precursor to what some believe will lead to more extreme forms of terrorism.

Authorities say that the vandalism may not have only been committed by far left extremists. The variety of targets suggest that the arsons don’t resemble a form of organized protests. Rather than that, they appear to be the work of random individual perpetrators.

So how are these arsonists able to do so much damage without getting caught? Experts say these perpetrators have been able to leave small burning coals underneath the tires of the targeted vehicles, and by the time visible flame is able to be seen, it is already too late for the vehicle and the perpetrators are long gone from the crime scene.

sources
http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,780965,00.html

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